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Porto goalkeeper Iker Casillas suffers heart attack

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Porto’s Spanish goalkeeper Iker Casillas is in hospital after suffering a heart attack at the club’s training center.”Iker Casillas suffered an acute myocardial infarction during morning practice this Wednesday, at the PortoGaia Sports Formation and Training Centre, in Olival,” Porto said in a statement sent to

“The work session was promptly interrupted so that assistance could be given to the FC Porto goalkeeper, who is at this moment at the CUP Porto Hospital. Casillas is fine, stable and with his cardiac problem resolved.”

A heart assault, or intense myocardial dead tissue, happens when a piece of the heart doesn’t get enough blood.

Casillas won the World Cup with Spain in 2010 and went through 16 seasons with La Liga goliath Real Madrid, winning three Champions League titles and five La Liga crowns.

The 37-year-old moved to Porto in 2015 where he won the Portuguese title last season.

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Michigan’s John Beilein leaving to coach Cleveland Cavaliers

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The most dominating mentor in Michigan ball history is made a beeline for the NBA.

A year in the wake of playing with training the Detroit Pistons, John Beilein has consented to mentor the Cleveland Cavaliers. The news was first announced by ESPN on Monday morning, expressing Beilein, 66, has consented to a five-year manage the association.

Beilein revealed to Michigan at the beginning of today he was without a doubt leaving to go to Cleveland, as indicated by a source with learning of the discussions. He at that point started telling his players. There are no quick plans set up to supplant him.

The move closes a standout amongst the most noteworthy keeps running in Michigan ball history, as Beilein went 278-150 over a 12-year range that included two excursions to the national title amusement, two Big Ten titles and two Big Ten Tournament titles.

Beilein has not returned a request for comment. Michigan basketball spokesman Tom Wywrot confirmed Beilein’s departure later Monday morning. 

Last summer, Michigan finalized a new contract with Beilein that was expected to keep him as the program’s head coach through the 2022-23 season. The plan was to keep him in Ann Arbor until he decided to retire from coaching. 

This all came after Beilein’s dicussions with the Pistons in the spring. After going through the process in May, Beilein ultimately opted to remove his name from consideration once he found out he wasn’t the team’s top choice. He expressed his interest in coaching professional basketball. But, at the time, said he believed he was meant to finish his coaching career at Michigan. 

“It became very clear to me where I was meant to finish coaching,” Beilein told the Free Press last June. “If you followed my career, it was ‘you’ve built this up, you’ve got it right and you leave the program in better shape than you found it.’ And then go and do it again somewhere else.

“I wasn’t offered the (Pistons) job. I was a finalist, but I wasn’t offered the job. And I decided rather than to go through it more, I knew where I needed to be.”

Things do change, obviously.

A source with learning of the circumstance told the Free Press on Monday that, after Beilein’s discussions with the Pistons a year ago, Michigan athletic chief Warde Manuel ended up persuaded that Beilein would leave Michigan if/when he got another idea from an expert group.

Manuel, per the source, has had a short rundown of applicants prepared since that time. Michigan athletic office initiative has begun the way toward inspecting future hopefuls, however no names have been clarified as of now.

Just like the case amid a year ago’s NBA talks: Beilein’s choice to engage star offers wasn’t monetarily spurred, but instead a continuous want for the 66-year-old mentor to take a stab at instructing in the NBA before resigning.

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Liverpool vs Barcelona: The ball boy who helped Reds complete a Champions League miracle

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Trent Alexander-Arnold has been hailed as a genius for the quick corner kick that led to Liverpool’s fourth and deciding goal last night. Yet to begin to understand the pursuit of impossible it is best to start with the instructions and the even spread of information. 

Liverpool’s match analysts had noticed last week in the Camp Nou how Barcelona’s players moaned and became distracted whenever a free-kick or a throw-in was awarded against them, even if the decision was blatantly the correct one. This made Jurgen Klopp recognise the possibilities. And so, he filtered a message through the club. It proves that he certainly had not given up – that Liverpool’s recovery was not purely borne out of adrenaline and special oils. His belief was not blind. It translated into plans and schemes.

Carl Lancaster is a coaching mentor at the club’s academy in Kirkby and amongst his responsibilities is the co-ordination of ball boys. He had told them to serve Liverpool’s players as swiftly as possible on Tuesday morning. Oakley Cannonier did not forget and with eleven minutes to go, he fed Alexander-Arnold while Barcelona’s defence fidgeted amongst themselves 20-yards away. It seemed astonishing they were blissfully unaware of what might happen considering Liverpool had already shown their bulldozing intent.

Cannonier is a 14-year-old initially from Leeds who once in a while prepares with two age bunches over his regular dimension. Whatever occurs in his profession or life from here, he will recollect his job in seemingly the most amazing triumph in Liverpool’s whole history, where Klopp’s group demonstrated their ability to decrease the godlike to hopeless wrecks and men of rock to goo.

It had implied such a great amount to Lionel Messi, he was crying as he stepped out into the abyss past to the medication testing region. Tears, in the interim, had tumbled from James Milner’s ragged looking eyes. In the changing area subsequently, the midfielder sat topless with his shirt depleting on the floor, half-grinning not by any means recognizing what to state or do.

Georginio Wijnaldum had welled-up as well. He was furious that he’d been left out of Liverpool’s first XI. Inside ten minutes of his introduction at half time, he’d touched the ball six times. He’d scored twice. In front of the TV cameras, the Dutchman – usually so eloquent and able to find the right words – could not.

While Wijnaldum passed up a beginning spot here, it was Jordan Henderson’s turn six days sooner in Barcelona. That the two players developed so persuasive mirrors Liverpool’s creativity, just as their assurance. In the 25th moment, Henderson, without a doubt, had appeared to be dead. On the floor. Not moving. Dead. A portion of the midfielder’s faultfinders may ask how an individual can bite the dust if he’s never truly lived? In spite of agony in his knee, Henderson rose. In the fifth moment of damage time, he was all the while running: charging at rivals and scaring them, just as thunder had charged his body.

“I was struggling a little bit when I got a whack on the knee, it was dead,” he admitted. “The doctor said just keep it moving. I managed to get to half time and I had a bit of treatment, took painkillers, all that stuff which helped. There was a jab and tablets. Both. Everything. I said: ‘just give us everything.’ So I managed to get through it and the crowd helped as well and keep us going.”

He could not really compute the outcome happened either. The best night of his career, he called it. “It was unbelievable. From start to finish I thought the lads were amazing. The atmosphere was amazing. It was just unbelievable.

“We were 3-0 down but still took confidence from the performance (in the first leg). Still believed that we were the better team over there, though it is hard to say that when you get beat 3-0. But in the changing room we had belief we could hurt them.”

Can there really be a more appropriate captain for Liverpool at this moment? A player written-off, but never by coaches. A team written off, but never by their fans. A city written off, but never by its inhabitants.

“I think we proved quite a few people wrong tonight,” Henderson declared. “We showed that if you never give up and you keep trying you can produce special things.”

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“We believe in him”: Philipp Grubauer discovers playoff mojo for Avalanche

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Philipp Grubauer’s change from Stanley Cup Playoffs flop to stud required a time of reflection and a difference in view.

His execution Thursday night in Game 4 against the Sharks? Splendid. The Avalanche goaltender ceased each of the 32 shots on objective in a 3-0 triumph to even the arrangement made a beeline for San Jose. It denoted the main Colorado postseason shutout since 2010 (Craig Anderson, 1-0 in OT versus the Sharks). Just five Avs/Nordiques goaltenders in establishment history — Patrick Roy, David Aebischer, Dan Bouchard, Anderson and Grubauer — have no less than one playoff diversion with zero objectives permitted.

Grubauer additionally turned into the main German-conceived NHL goalie in history to record a postseason shutout.

“He’s just making everything look easy,” defenseman Erik Johnson said. “When you have a goalie that’s doing that, I think it just trickles down your lineup. I can’t say enough good things about him and how well he’s played. … We believe in him.”

It’s a near 180-degree reputation change compared to the previous NHL playoffs. Grubauer won a 2018 Stanley Cup with the Washington Capitals, but not until after a first-round benching by coach Barry Trotz. A warranted change, too, after Grubauer allowed a combined eight goals in two overtime losses to Columbus. Washington turned back to goalie Braden Holtby and eventually claimed the championship.

“You definitely learn from it,” Grubauer said, “and move on.”

Thursday night provided continued redemption. Grubauer, now 12-3-2 in net since March 17, was at his best when Colorado needed him most. Coach Jared Bednar said his team went “brain dead at the end of the second period” after multiple defensive lapses gave San Jose breakaway opportunities. Grubauer never blinked.

“He made some big saves at key times for us,” Bednar said. “It was a big performance by him — no question.”

Grubauer has no intention of dwelling on the past. “It’s a whole year and a whole different team,” he said on Thursday. Yet Grubauer can still use the experience to help inspire his own title run as Colorado’s go-to goalie, as he explained during a sit-down interview with The Denver Post in April.

“You work for that your whole life, you grow up looking at the Stanley Cup as your goal, and to actually hold it and lift it and hoist it on the ice with the team you battle through the whole year with was unbelievable. I can’t even describe it,” Gruabuer said. “You want to create that same feeling in here. We know we can do that with this group. Now the work starts. In order to win the cup learned you have to be perfect for two-and-a-half months. Every shift and every detail on the ice. Everybody has got to chip in.”

Grubauer, while erasing the ghosts of his playoff past, has done more than enough so far to keep Colorado’s championship dreams alive.

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